Mìorun Mòr nan Gall, ‘The Great Ill-Will of the Lowlander’? Lowland Perceptions of the Highlands, Medieval and Modern

deasaichte le / edited by Dauvit Broun & Martin MacGregor

2007

GAELIC VERSION TO FOLLOW

For centuries, the ‘Highland/Lowland divide’ has been regarded as crucial to how we see and understand Scotland’s landscape, history, literature, and culture. Highland symbolism stands proxy for the nation as a whole, yet at the same time external perceptions of the region and its people have usually been deeply negative. That hostile perspective is summed up in the famous phrase associated with the great 18th century Gaelic poet Alasdair mac Mhaighstir Alasdair (Alexander MacDonald): Mìorun mòr nan Gall, ‘the great ill-will of the Lowlander’.

Much has already been written on the divide and its related perceptions, particularly in the context of modern Scotland. This book aims to break new ground by bringing together eight studies which investigate Lowland perceptions of the Highlands across both medieval and modern timeframes; across the disciplines of history, literature, and the visual arts; and in settings outwith Scotland.

ISBN: 0 85261 820 X

clàr-innse / contents

PART I THE ‘HIGHLAND/LOWLAND DIVIDE’ IN THE MIDDLE AGES

1. Gaelic Barbarity and Scottish Identity in the Later Middle Ages, Martin MacGregor

2. Attitudes of Gall to Gaedhel in Scotland before John of Fordun, Dauvit Broun

3. The Gaelic World and the Early Stewart Court, Stephen Boardman

4. Highlands and Lowlands in Late Medieval Tuscany, Samuel K. Cohn, Jnr

PART II THE ‘HIGHLANDS’ AND ‘LOWLAND’ IDENTITY, LATE 18TH – EARLY 20TH CENTURIES

5 The Highland Landscape: Visual Depictions, 1760–1883, Anne MacLeod

6. ‘Beyond the Dusky Barrier’: Perceptions of the Highlands in the Waverley Novels, Alison Lumsden

7. Highlands and Lowlands, Romance and Realism: The Fiction of Neil Munro, Douglas Gifford

8. Poverty, Protest and Politics: Perceptions of the Scottish Highlands in the 1880s, Ewen A. Cameron